History & Heritage

The Cathedral Church of All Saints was founded in 943, and is at the heart of a modern city of making.  It is one of Derby’s most beautiful and historic sites and holds many important monuments of Derby’s and Derbyshire’s past.  Inside you will find many treasures such as the tomb of Bess of Hardwick, a memorial to Florence Nightingale and the impressive wrought iron screen by Robert Bakewell.   There is much to find out about the Cathedral’s stories and history.

Timeline of Derby Cathedral

The Enlightenment

Derby Cathedral’s nave was re-built in 1725 to a Neo-Classical design by the architect James Gibbs.   The interior is unique in its simplicity and flooding of natural light, with only two modern stained glass windows.

To offset the plain interior, Gibbs introduced a wrought-iron chancel screen manufactured by local iron-smith Robert Bakewell, which extends across the width of the church and is a key feature of the Cathedral.

Take a read

Stories to discover

Bess of Hardwick (Elizabeth, the Countess of Shrewsbury) was a formidable woman who was ahead of her time.  In 1590 she purchased an area in the church to build a crypt to house her remains and those of her descendants.  As a result of her second marriage to Sir William Cavendish, there are now over forty coffins of the Cavendish family occupied in the vaults, including that of the equally famous Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire.

Bess of Hardwick’s flamboyant monument can be seen in the Cavendish area, a space representative of her and her family’s long association with the Cathedral.

There are many other stories to discover at Derby Cathedral, embodied in monuments and plaques such as Joseph Wright and Bonnie Prince Charlie. We hope you visit to find out more.

Visit us

Derby Cathedral,

18-19 Iron Gate,

Derby,

DE1 3GP

Call: 01332 341201

Email: office@derbycathedral.org

We're open

Monday – Saturday

11:00 – 15:00

Sunday

13:00 – 16:00

Please check the Visit page for up to date information

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